27 Jun

Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

News Picture: Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

Latest Womens Health News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Female runners with a low body weight are more likely to have stress fractures and take longer to recover from them, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center reviewed data on dozens of injuries suffered by female college runners. They found that runners with a body mass index (BMI) below 19 were more likely to suffer stress fractures than others. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height.

Women with a low body weight were also sidelined longer after an injury. Among those with the most severe stress fractures, recovery time was 13 weeks for women with a BMI of 19 or higher. That compared to more than 17 weeks for those with a BMI below 19, the study found.

“We found that over time, we were able to identify the factors that put female runners at an increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy Miller, assistant professor of clinical orthopedic surgery and sports medicine.

“One of the most important factors we identified was low body weight, or low body mass index,” he said in a hospital news release.

Having too little lean muscle mass to dissipate the impact of repetitive pounding on hard surfaces makes the bones of runners’ legs vulnerable to injury, according to Miller.

“When body mass index is very low and muscle mass is depleted, there is nowhere for the shock of running to be absorbed other than directly into the bones. Until some muscle mass is developed and BMI is optimized, runners remain at increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” he explained.

Female athletes should maintain a BMI of 20 to 24, Miller suggested.

A woman who is 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighs 120 pounds has a BMI of 20, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The BMI for an average American woman is 26, the CDC says.

To prevent injury, Miller said women should stay at a healthy BMI and include resistance training in their workout regimen to strengthen their lower legs, “even if that means adding weight from additional muscle mass.”

The study was published recently in the journal Current Orthopaedic Practice.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 12, 2017

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27 Jun

A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

News Picture: A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Want to help protect your children from skin cancer as they get older? Make sure they never get a serious sunburn in childhood.

Just one blistering burn as a child or teen nearly doubles the risk of getting melanoma, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Sun protection is important at every stage of life, including infancy. Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, including melanoma,” said pediatric dermatologist Sheila Fallon Friedlander. She’s a professor of pediatrics and dermatology at the University of California, San Diego.

“Keep sun-safety items near the front door, in your car and in your diaper bag so that you always have them ready when you’re on the go,” Fallon Friedlander recommended in an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) news release.

Other tips from Fallon Friedlander and the AAD include:

  • Dress your baby in sun-protective clothing, such as lightweight, long-sleeved shirts and pants, as well as a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.
  • Try to keep your baby in the shade. If you can’t find shade, create your own using an umbrella, canopy or stroller hood.
  • Avoid using sunscreen on children younger than 6 months old if possible, but use a minimal amount if needed. It should be a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. Sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide are less likely to irritate a baby’s sensitive skin. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or sweating.

Along with sun protection, keep babies safe on hot days by making sure they don’t get overheated and that they drink plenty of fluids, Fallon Friedlander advised.

If your baby gets fussy, cries excessively or develops redness on any exposed skin, take him or her indoors immediately.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, June 13, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

News Picture: Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A new federal report finds that fewer U.S. teens and young adults are indulging in frat-party style drinking because their levels of binge drinking have gone down over the past six years.

But not all teens and young adults are forgoing extra drinks. Fourteen percent of young people from 12 to 20 years old reported binge drinking at least once within the past four weeks.

Binge drinking is defined as five or more drinks on one occasion within a few hours, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA).

“Alcohol use continues to be a serious public health issue for young people, their families, and communities,” said Frances Harding, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention at SAMHSA.

“We’ve made plenty of progress through prevention efforts, yet the work still needs to continue.” she said in an agency news release.

The findings about underage drinking appear in a report issued by SAMHSA and are based on an annual survey of 67,500 people in the United States aged 12 and older.

The consequences of excess drinking in youth are significant. About 4,300 underage drinkers die each year from excess drinking, the report said. Kids who binge-drink in high school are more likely to do poorly in school, have sex with six or more partners, and to try illicit drugs such as marijuana and cocaine, according to the researchers.

The survey found that the percentage of underage binge drinking over the last month was highest in North Dakota, Vermont and New Hampshire, all at 21 percent.

Excess drinking by teens and young adults was lowest in North Carolina (12 percent) and Tennessee and Utah, both at 11 percent, the report found.

— Randy Dotinga

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, press release, June 22, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

News Picture: Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

Latest Womens Health News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Female runners with a low body weight are more likely to have stress fractures and take longer to recover from them, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center reviewed data on dozens of injuries suffered by female college runners. They found that runners with a body mass index (BMI) below 19 were more likely to suffer stress fractures than others. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height.

Women with a low body weight were also sidelined longer after an injury. Among those with the most severe stress fractures, recovery time was 13 weeks for women with a BMI of 19 or higher. That compared to more than 17 weeks for those with a BMI below 19, the study found.

“We found that over time, we were able to identify the factors that put female runners at an increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy Miller, assistant professor of clinical orthopedic surgery and sports medicine.

“One of the most important factors we identified was low body weight, or low body mass index,” he said in a hospital news release.

Having too little lean muscle mass to dissipate the impact of repetitive pounding on hard surfaces makes the bones of runners’ legs vulnerable to injury, according to Miller.

“When body mass index is very low and muscle mass is depleted, there is nowhere for the shock of running to be absorbed other than directly into the bones. Until some muscle mass is developed and BMI is optimized, runners remain at increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” he explained.

Female athletes should maintain a BMI of 20 to 24, Miller suggested.

A woman who is 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighs 120 pounds has a BMI of 20, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The BMI for an average American woman is 26, the CDC says.

To prevent injury, Miller said women should stay at a healthy BMI and include resistance training in their workout regimen to strengthen their lower legs, “even if that means adding weight from additional muscle mass.”

The study was published recently in the journal Current Orthopaedic Practice.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 12, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

News Picture: A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Want to help protect your children from skin cancer as they get older? Make sure they never get a serious sunburn in childhood.

Just one blistering burn as a child or teen nearly doubles the risk of getting melanoma, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Sun protection is important at every stage of life, including infancy. Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, including melanoma,” said pediatric dermatologist Sheila Fallon Friedlander. She’s a professor of pediatrics and dermatology at the University of California, San Diego.

“Keep sun-safety items near the front door, in your car and in your diaper bag so that you always have them ready when you’re on the go,” Fallon Friedlander recommended in an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) news release.

Other tips from Fallon Friedlander and the AAD include:

  • Dress your baby in sun-protective clothing, such as lightweight, long-sleeved shirts and pants, as well as a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.
  • Try to keep your baby in the shade. If you can’t find shade, create your own using an umbrella, canopy or stroller hood.
  • Avoid using sunscreen on children younger than 6 months old if possible, but use a minimal amount if needed. It should be a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. Sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide are less likely to irritate a baby’s sensitive skin. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or sweating.

Along with sun protection, keep babies safe on hot days by making sure they don’t get overheated and that they drink plenty of fluids, Fallon Friedlander advised.

If your baby gets fussy, cries excessively or develops redness on any exposed skin, take him or her indoors immediately.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, June 13, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

News Picture: Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A new federal report finds that fewer U.S. teens and young adults are indulging in frat-party style drinking because their levels of binge drinking have gone down over the past six years.

But not all teens and young adults are forgoing extra drinks. Fourteen percent of young people from 12 to 20 years old reported binge drinking at least once within the past four weeks.

Binge drinking is defined as five or more drinks on one occasion within a few hours, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA).

“Alcohol use continues to be a serious public health issue for young people, their families, and communities,” said Frances Harding, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention at SAMHSA.

“We’ve made plenty of progress through prevention efforts, yet the work still needs to continue.” she said in an agency news release.

The findings about underage drinking appear in a report issued by SAMHSA and are based on an annual survey of 67,500 people in the United States aged 12 and older.

The consequences of excess drinking in youth are significant. About 4,300 underage drinkers die each year from excess drinking, the report said. Kids who binge-drink in high school are more likely to do poorly in school, have sex with six or more partners, and to try illicit drugs such as marijuana and cocaine, according to the researchers.

The survey found that the percentage of underage binge drinking over the last month was highest in North Dakota, Vermont and New Hampshire, all at 21 percent.

Excess drinking by teens and young adults was lowest in North Carolina (12 percent) and Tennessee and Utah, both at 11 percent, the report found.

— Randy Dotinga

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, press release, June 22, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

News Picture: Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

Latest Womens Health News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Female runners with a low body weight are more likely to have stress fractures and take longer to recover from them, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center reviewed data on dozens of injuries suffered by female college runners. They found that runners with a body mass index (BMI) below 19 were more likely to suffer stress fractures than others. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height.

Women with a low body weight were also sidelined longer after an injury. Among those with the most severe stress fractures, recovery time was 13 weeks for women with a BMI of 19 or higher. That compared to more than 17 weeks for those with a BMI below 19, the study found.

“We found that over time, we were able to identify the factors that put female runners at an increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy Miller, assistant professor of clinical orthopedic surgery and sports medicine.

“One of the most important factors we identified was low body weight, or low body mass index,” he said in a hospital news release.

Having too little lean muscle mass to dissipate the impact of repetitive pounding on hard surfaces makes the bones of runners’ legs vulnerable to injury, according to Miller.

“When body mass index is very low and muscle mass is depleted, there is nowhere for the shock of running to be absorbed other than directly into the bones. Until some muscle mass is developed and BMI is optimized, runners remain at increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” he explained.

Female athletes should maintain a BMI of 20 to 24, Miller suggested.

A woman who is 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighs 120 pounds has a BMI of 20, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The BMI for an average American woman is 26, the CDC says.

To prevent injury, Miller said women should stay at a healthy BMI and include resistance training in their workout regimen to strengthen their lower legs, “even if that means adding weight from additional muscle mass.”

The study was published recently in the journal Current Orthopaedic Practice.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 12, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

News Picture: A Baby's Skin No Match for the Sun

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Want to help protect your children from skin cancer as they get older? Make sure they never get a serious sunburn in childhood.

Just one blistering burn as a child or teen nearly doubles the risk of getting melanoma, according to the American Academy of Dermatology.

Sun protection is important at every stage of life, including infancy. Sun exposure is the most preventable risk factor for skin cancer, including melanoma,” said pediatric dermatologist Sheila Fallon Friedlander. She’s a professor of pediatrics and dermatology at the University of California, San Diego.

“Keep sun-safety items near the front door, in your car and in your diaper bag so that you always have them ready when you’re on the go,” Fallon Friedlander recommended in an American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) news release.

Other tips from Fallon Friedlander and the AAD include:

  • Dress your baby in sun-protective clothing, such as lightweight, long-sleeved shirts and pants, as well as a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses with UV protection.
  • Try to keep your baby in the shade. If you can’t find shade, create your own using an umbrella, canopy or stroller hood.
  • Avoid using sunscreen on children younger than 6 months old if possible, but use a minimal amount if needed. It should be a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of at least 30. Sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide are less likely to irritate a baby’s sensitive skin. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or sweating.

Along with sun protection, keep babies safe on hot days by making sure they don’t get overheated and that they drink plenty of fluids, Fallon Friedlander advised.

If your baby gets fussy, cries excessively or develops redness on any exposed skin, take him or her indoors immediately.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, June 13, 2017

Let’s block ads! (Why?)


Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

News Picture: Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking

Latest Healthy Kids News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — A new federal report finds that fewer U.S. teens and young adults are indulging in frat-party style drinking because their levels of binge drinking have gone down over the past six years.

But not all teens and young adults are forgoing extra drinks. Fourteen percent of young people from 12 to 20 years old reported binge drinking at least once within the past four weeks.

Binge drinking is defined as five or more drinks on one occasion within a few hours, according to the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA).

“Alcohol use continues to be a serious public health issue for young people, their families, and communities,” said Frances Harding, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention at SAMHSA.

“We’ve made plenty of progress through prevention efforts, yet the work still needs to continue.” she said in an agency news release.

The findings about underage drinking appear in a report issued by SAMHSA and are based on an annual survey of 67,500 people in the United States aged 12 and older.

The consequences of excess drinking in youth are significant. About 4,300 underage drinkers die each year from excess drinking, the report said. Kids who binge-drink in high school are more likely to do poorly in school, have sex with six or more partners, and to try illicit drugs such as marijuana and cocaine, according to the researchers.

The survey found that the percentage of underage binge drinking over the last month was highest in North Dakota, Vermont and New Hampshire, all at 21 percent.

Excess drinking by teens and young adults was lowest in North Carolina (12 percent) and Tennessee and Utah, both at 11 percent, the report found.

— Randy Dotinga

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, press release, June 22, 2017

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Source: MediciNet

27 Jun

Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

News Picture: Being Thin Could Boost Stress Fracture Risk in Female Runners

Latest Womens Health News

FRIDAY, June 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Female runners with a low body weight are more likely to have stress fractures and take longer to recover from them, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center reviewed data on dozens of injuries suffered by female college runners. They found that runners with a body mass index (BMI) below 19 were more likely to suffer stress fractures than others. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on weight and height.

Women with a low body weight were also sidelined longer after an injury. Among those with the most severe stress fractures, recovery time was 13 weeks for women with a BMI of 19 or higher. That compared to more than 17 weeks for those with a BMI below 19, the study found.

“We found that over time, we were able to identify the factors that put female runners at an increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” said study co-author Dr. Timothy Miller, assistant professor of clinical orthopedic surgery and sports medicine.

“One of the most important factors we identified was low body weight, or low body mass index,” he said in a hospital news release.

Having too little lean muscle mass to dissipate the impact of repetitive pounding on hard surfaces makes the bones of runners’ legs vulnerable to injury, according to Miller.

“When body mass index is very low and muscle mass is depleted, there is nowhere for the shock of running to be absorbed other than directly into the bones. Until some muscle mass is developed and BMI is optimized, runners remain at increased risk of developing a stress fracture,” he explained.

Female athletes should maintain a BMI of 20 to 24, Miller suggested.

A woman who is 5 feet, 5 inches tall and weighs 120 pounds has a BMI of 20, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The BMI for an average American woman is 26, the CDC says.

To prevent injury, Miller said women should stay at a healthy BMI and include resistance training in their workout regimen to strengthen their lower legs, “even if that means adding weight from additional muscle mass.”

The study was published recently in the journal Current Orthopaedic Practice.

— Robert Preidt

MedicalNews
Copyright © 2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

SOURCE: Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, news release, June 12, 2017

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Source: MediciNet